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Discussion Forum - Events - Heart of Scotland 105


Author: Eileen Greenwood
Posted: Mon 18th Oct 2010, 17:47
Joined: 2002
Local Group: Yorkshire Coast
Oops- just seen your adress- will email you.
Author: Eileen Greenwood
Posted: Mon 18th Oct 2010, 17:46
Joined: 2002
Local Group: Yorkshire Coast
Mike- I know I'm very late but any spare CDs? If not, no worries.
Author: Andrew Sansum
Posted: Sun 17th Oct 2010, 0:01
Joined: 2005
Just got the DVD - very evocative, thanks very much. On the strength of it just downloaded I'm Gonna Be for motivation when spirits are low for the next big event!
Author: MIke Rayner
Posted: Thu 14th Oct 2010, 8:13
Joined: 1983
If you ordered a DVD, they are being posted out today
Author: MIke Rayner
Posted: Wed 29th Sep 2010, 5:41
Joined: 1983
A reminder that the deadline for ordering DVDs is 30 September. You can e-mail me, mike@rayner77.freeserve.co.uk, with your address and phone number to reserve a copy and send the cheque separately.
Author: MIke Rayner
Posted: Wed 1st Sep 2010, 13:09
Joined: 1983
Please see the item in News about ordering DVDs of the event
Author: Eileen Greenwood
Posted: Sun 13th Jun 2010, 15:19
Joined: 2002
Local Group: Yorkshire Coast
And the photos remind us all of what beautiful scenery it is up there! And what a happy odd assortment of folks we all are! I've been awaiting these photos for ages and my boss even keeps asking if they have appeared. I'll be able to show her them now. I'd love to go back again and see the area. But then I say that after every 100 and never get there. But I will to Perthshire.
Author: Eileen Greenwood
Posted: Sun 13th Jun 2010, 15:06
Joined: 2002
Local Group: Yorkshire Coast
Well said John. As for the next 100.... I volunteer for the Marshals event in any capacity I maybe of use. There, I've said it.. no going back now!
Author: Ken Walker
Posted: Sun 13th Jun 2010, 15:02
Joined: 2009
Local Group: Heart of Scotland
Folks,
I’ve found my jacket that I thought was missing. Despite thinking I had searched everywhere in the house, I did indeed find it this morning in a dark recess tucked in with other dark items! I think my brain has been more addled than I thought by the event – that’s my only excuse for not finding it sooner! Thank you to everyone who looked for it.
Sue
Author: Paul Hatcher
Posted: Sun 13th Jun 2010, 11:10
Joined: 1984
Local Group: Cumbria
Thanks to you all for your kind comments.
We the organising committee did what we could to ensure that things were in place to enable you to have a good weekend. Throughout the preceding two years we constantly had to rearrange and rebook things, this continued even up to and on the day. We should write a book!
In the end it is the groups and helpers that pulled it all together and deserve the praise for the efficient way that they ran the checkpoints and went about their various tasks. I am now contacting them with your and our thanks.
Thank You to all that answered the late appeal for help. My apologies for not getting back to you all, or being available when you called in at the start. I know that many of you did just slot yourselves in where you felt help was needed. Very many thanks.
On a more sombre note we are trying to trace two Jackets and a pair of shorts all with items of value in the pockets + three items of merchandise that have been mislaid/went missing. I also have numerous items of lost property that are sitting in my spare room, a list of these and photos will be on the Heart of Scotland website soon.
Author: Garfield & Helen Southall
Posted: Sun 13th Jun 2010, 9:29
Joined: 1991
Local Group: Merseystride
Thanks to Steve Clark for another great set of photos. Although I did the Marshals' Walk and manned a desk during the main event, it's wonderful to see how everyone was doing "out there". Well done Steve - Well done everyone! (Garfield)

http://www.ldwa.org.uk/hundreds/gallery.php?gallery=2010%20Heart%20Of%20Scotland&first=0&last=49
Author: Ken Walker
Posted: Fri 11th Jun 2010, 23:37
Joined: 2009
Local Group: Heart of Scotland
Anyone find a black OMM rain jacket at the end? I left mine behind. I finished at 6.20pm on Sunday. I'd be happy to pay the postage to get it back. (It may have been used as a cover on someone who finshed 6.25-6.30pm ish. He had a lie down outside the drill hall. When I left, he had a black jacket over his head. ...I didn't notice my missing jacket at the time, but now I'm wondering if I dropped it on him!)
Author: John Phillips
Posted: Fri 11th Jun 2010, 16:01
Joined: 2007
Local Group: South Pennine
Just like to echo the sentiments of other posters. Great event, thanks to all the local groups who manned the event centre and the checkpoints and everything inbetween, Raynet, the local people who made us very welcome,fellow walkers but primarily the organisers who have spent the best part of 5 years to bring us this event. Not having a local group in the area made it significantly harder for the organisers who had to make significant journeys just to make even minor arrangements. Late problems such as access beyond Glenmore Bothy and a landslip near the end made a difficult job even harder. Take a wellearned breather but please come back once refreshed, the LDWA needs people like you.
To all those who walked the event, if you fully appreciated the sacrifices made by the organisers you will make yourselves available in some capacity for next years event whether this be on the Marshals' walk or in some capacity on the day. These events only work due to volunteers and to give a day back is not asking too much compared with the efforts of the organisers.
Author: John King
Posted: Wed 9th Jun 2010, 22:16
Joined: 2002
Hi
Just got back in front of the PC and i feel I must thank all concerned with the HOS 100, it was truly a Gem, the route was inspired with something for everybody, and yet not to much of anything that should cause complaint, a master stroke indeed.

Food at all the Checkpoints was a gastronomic delight and the MARMITE sandwiches yet another inspiration, as to limited supplies at remote checkpoints i certainly did not notice it, in fact i marveled at how so much food found it`s way to such remote spots.

Absolutely everybody I came across seemed like an old friend and all were a real pleasure to meet and spend time with.

I could go on and on and on but rather than bore all and sundry I will just Send my heartfelt thanks to everybody involved with the HOS 100 it was truly a class act and a TRIUMPH well done ALL.

Oh the extra 4.4 miles was a bonus:-) thanks
JohnK

p.s the Skirl of the Bagpipes leading us out was truly amazing and really set the scene for me, so I really must include the PIPE BAND in with my thanks.

Also we spent the rest of the week in Dunkeld walking the various routes that surround the area and it was a delight to discover such a beautiful area that we have always by-passed on the A9 when heading further north, another thing we learned from speaking to the locals is that the LDWA have left an extremely Favorable impression behind them, not least of all the cutting of the Heather through to Kirkmichael, which was remarked upon on more than one occasion.

Again well done LDWA and thanks
Author: John Gurnhill
Posted: Wed 9th Jun 2010, 18:43
Joined: 1995
Local Group: Sherwood
Thank you for the interest and comments shown in the first few videos I uploaded. I am now putting the photos from my reccees, into videos. So far I have done section 6 and section 17...view on www.youtube.com/catman2007 . I will do parts of the two sections either side of Kinloch Rannoch as soon as possible. I hope also to do the whole of the Northumberland 100 in the same way, which may bring back some happy (or not..I did not copmplete that one) memories, and also st Cuthbert's Way, which I covered at the same time since the routes overlapped. This is easier than book publishing. Pity I get no royalties!! Hadrian's Wall walk is also available now, 2500 pix in 8 mins! Hope you enjoy this.
Author: John Jocys
Posted: Wed 9th Jun 2010, 8:52
Joined: 2003
Local Group: East Lancashire
Many thanks for the very helpful replies, both directly and on the forum, regarding lost / left property - we now have a Plan!

Viv
Author: Merrian Lancaster
Posted: Tue 8th Jun 2010, 14:22
Joined: 1996
Local Group: Beds, Bucks and Northants
Author: Louise Whittaker
Posted: Mon 7th Jun 2010, 22:48
Joined: 1994
Local Group: Staffordshire
Wracked with disappointment as tore a muscle two weeks before the HoS 100 (and my first 100). Disappointment particularly acute at the 'start' with the fantastic send-off with the bagpipes. BUT in the end I had an absolutely great time at the breakfast stop with the East Lancs team. Thank you so much to Peter Haslam, and all the team there - for their great hearts - and being so inclusive, and putting me to 'work' straight away. It was great fun - and hard work! In fact - it must be the best well kept secret ever - but now I'm shouting it loud and clear - give yourself a treat and help out on a 100 sometime - it really is a great experience.
Author: Garfield & Helen Southall
Posted: Sun 6th Jun 2010, 21:47
Joined: 1991
Local Group: Merseystride
John - and others - just send an email regarding any post-event enquiries to entries@heartofscotland100.org.uk and we'll direct them to the appropriate person. (Garfield)
Author: Duncan Baber
Posted: Sun 6th Jun 2010, 21:10
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Wiltshire
I wanted to add my thanks and appreciation to the chorus of replies already posted. From the perspective of a week on, I can now walk using my heels once more without wincing, and the majority of my blisters have subsided.

Thanks to everyone involved in organising and marshalling. It was a wonderful event in superb countryside. The route description was very good – I think I managed to stay on-route the whole time – although in my tired state I did convince myself that in the last couple of miles there were enough right hand turns for the route to have crossed back over itself more than once! The checkpoints were well organised and the marshals ever-helpful (special kudos to those manning the outdoor checkpoints overnight)!

Highlights: the off-road section below Schiehallion, getting a “second wind” after leaving Aberfeldy following 15 minutes spent horizontal in the checkpoint, meeting some great people along the way, custard and bananas served at more than one checkpoint, the cooked breakfast and no midges!

Lowlights: (for some reason) the riverside path into Aberfeldy (it just seemed to go on for ever), the very muddy and steep ascent after the clip point before Kinloch Rannoch, the enforced extra miles along the road into Fortingall.

Roll on next year’s 100!
Author: Stephen Mayne
Posted: Sun 6th Jun 2010, 19:31
Joined: 1992
Local Group: Dorset
Well done Kev on your 1st 100, I would also like to thank Bob Holdsworth for his encouragement in the past and his company on a few 50's and the Fellsman in the past, seems to show what the LDWA is all about. Special thanks to all of the HoS marshals and helpers it was a toughie! Told myself that the '100 really wasn't my event on the last 6 miles though I was psyching up for Shropshire on Monday morning after good nights sleep. Still have Compeed heels a week later!!!
Author: Kevin O'Hara
Posted: Sun 6th Jun 2010, 16:50
Joined: 2000
Local Group: West Yorkshire
After completing my first 100 I would like to thank, firstly Robert Holdsworth and Malcolm Walmsley for getting me through the bad time and not forgetting all the checkpoint staff who were fantastic.
Author: John Jocys
Posted: Sun 6th Jun 2010, 15:10
Joined: 2003
Local Group: East Lancashire
Does anyone know how to contact the event organiser - I understand he's got the lost / left property. I've been phoning him since Monday afternoon (the hall was all shut up when I got back there to collect my bag) but his phone goes straight to answering service.

Thanks

Viv Pike (No373)
Author: Paul Burgess
Posted: Sat 5th Jun 2010, 21:57
Joined: 2005
Local Group: Cornwall & Devon
Arrived back from Scotland late last night and wanted to add my thanks to everybody involved in making such a memorable event for me (even the kind gentleman at Fortingall CP who had to put up with my smelly feet whilst he dressed my blisters!). After last years low (pulling out after 82mls) I finally got that 100 monkey off my back and completed my first one, what a feeling! I'm just glad me and my wife also had this last week up there which allowed us to go visit some of the walk areas in slow time. I'm sure I must have bored her by giving feedback of this was where ...... etc! And the weather was superb as well. Our first visit to Scotland, my first 100 finish and great memories. Thanks again to all concerned.
Author: Tony Willey
Posted: Fri 4th Jun 2010, 22:38
Joined: 1989
Local Group: Lakeland
Yes, I too noticed one or two errors on the provisional results, but I have no doubt that Keith Warman will sort those out when it comes to the definitive record of completions.
Author: Madeleine Watson
Posted: Fri 4th Jun 2010, 20:04
Joined: 2002
Local Group: West Yorkshire
Tony - Hope you didn't do your calculation of 1st timers from the info on the provisional results - that seems to be wrong for quite a number of people (eg I am down as doing my first but it isn't, and Alison Brind is down as doing 1 but she was of the ones doing her 10th).

I note with glee (not that I'm sexist!) that whilst there might not be as many women as men doing it, we have a better completion rate.

I'm also amazed that there were only 76 who started later - I thought there were 100 on the 12 o'clock start! Obviously not.
Author: Eileen Greenwood
Posted: Fri 4th Jun 2010, 18:42
Joined: 2002
Local Group: Yorkshire Coast
I agree with Madeleine. The useless info is very interesting! And as for the blisters- I have suffered the same, even though I used same shoes/socks etc,etc.
I have given up on the blister front. Next 100- slippers. Walking ones of course.

It was a lovely area. A few of us went to the Loch of the Lowes and viewed the Ospreys's nest. Fantastic. As well as seeing the red squirrels up close!
Can we have the next AGM up there please? Dunkeld Hilton has a fine spa- we used it. And Martin S from Northumbria had a full body massage!
Author: Madeleine Watson
Posted: Fri 4th Jun 2010, 15:26
Joined: 2002
Local Group: West Yorkshire
Tony - Interesting not fairly useless! Thanks.

What made it tough for me I think were a) the climb out of Aberfeldy, coming so late in the event and the fact that although I knew there was quite a climb, I hadn't realised that it just went up and up and up! I'd seen the route but not a profile of the leg. The marshall's walk was no use here- you were all fresh and obviously just breezed up the hill!

b) my mobile phone stopped working because it got wet so I couldn't keep in touch with my family and was disappointed when they weren't at Aberfeldy. It wouldn't have taken much to keep the phone in a plastic bag! Lesson for next year.

c) the blisters I got round the edge of my heels and underneath the front of my foot. I used the same shoes, sox, changed them, put vaseline on to start with, but still suffered. Before when I've had blisters it's been from the heat - don't think that was the case this year.

So 2 things which more or less down to my lack of preparation and 1 I really can't explain.
Author: Tony Willey
Posted: Fri 4th Jun 2010, 12:50
Joined: 1989
Local Group: Lakeland
A few more figures from DOFUS (the Department Of Fairly Useless Statistics):-

1. Only 5% of the entry finished within 30 hours. Since the millenium the lowest figures have been 4% (Kent & Lakeland) and the highest 19% (Chiltern).
2. 26% of the entry finished within 36 hours, compared with 21% for Lakeland and 53% for Chiltern.
3. 49% of the entry finished within 42 hours, compared with 37% for Lakeland and 67% for Chiltern.
4. The retirement rate was 29%, compared with 43% for Lakeland and 17% for Chiltern.
5. 76 started at the later start times, of whom 24 (31%) retired.
So a tough Hundred but not the toughest. The rain on Saturday night certainly made the main event a harder proposition than the marshals walk, where we had light rain on Saturday but good conditions underfoot on the sections either side of Kinloch Rannoch. Looking at the times of people who normally have similar times to me, I estimate that we benefitted by around 2 hours.
6. There were a remarkable 175 first timers (or at least had not previously completed a Hundred), 35% of the entry. The retirement rate of first-timers was 50 (29%), the same as the whole field.
7. There were 109 ladies, (22%), of whom 31(28%) retired.
8. 16 participants had previously completed either 9 or 19 Hundreds, and not one retired. Those badges are a powerful incentive!
9. The huge interest in the HOS Hundred is reflected in the viewings on this forum. Hundred threads are typically the most popular ones, but I think I am right in saying that previous events have seen a maximum of 2000 - 3000 viewings. The various threads that have been started for the HOS have had well over 10, 000 viewings already.

Roll on Ludlow!
Author: Merrian Lancaster
Posted: Fri 4th Jun 2010, 9:27
Joined: 1996
Local Group: Beds, Bucks and Northants
Based on the provisional results, 71% completed this year. The completion rate in the Lakes in 2002 was 57% and Kent in 2000 was 64%.

I didn’t take part, but saw enough people where I was checkpointing, and at the end, to know that everyone found it tough this year. So I don’t know what to make of the figures. Are you all fitter, more determined, better prepared? Maybe it just confirms that you can’t compare 100s.
Author: Madeleine Watson
Posted: Thu 3rd Jun 2010, 22:51
Joined: 2002
Local Group: West Yorkshire
Yes I had to use my new tick remover! Only a small one - remover did the biz!
Author: Eileen Greenwood
Posted: Thu 3rd Jun 2010, 21:20
Joined: 2002
Local Group: Yorkshire Coast
Did anyone have to use their tick removal tool?
I was too busy with my blisters to bother about ticks! But I was totally covered up except when answering the call of nature and then all wildlife scattered I expect.
Author: Ian & Patricia Sage
Posted: Thu 3rd Jun 2010, 19:43
Joined: 1995
Local Group: Beds, Bucks and Northants
A year ago today, I had three coronary stents inserted having been diagnosed with angina and partially blocked arteries. Subsequently, I lost confidence to walk, run and cycle but having been forced to pull out of the Wessex 100 my confidence eventually returned and I decided to enter the HoS 100.
Today, I have tired legs and feet and the most wonderful memories of a very special event. As expected, the scenery was spectacular and the checkpoints and food were to the usual LDWA high standards. However, the most memorable part of the event for me was the people, whether they were checkpoint staff, my walking partners or the new friends I met along the way.
My thanks and congratulations to everyone involved.
Ian Sage
Author: John Gurnhill
Posted: Thu 3rd Jun 2010, 16:45
Joined: 1995
Local Group: Sherwood
What a great event, and so well organised. I award full marks to everyone concerned with making it run so well.
I was very concerned for a long time on the event as to whether I would run out of time, with the extra 4.44 miles possibly taking up to 3 hours.. However, in the event things turned out well, and with a thank you to Jim Drummond, who stayed with me through the second night, I comopleted in 45.55 .
Members may be interested in a few short vidoes, and they can be found at http://tinyurl.com/hos100
Tank you, and see you all again next year, which hopefully will be my 10th completion.
Author: Rebecca Lawrence
Posted: Thu 3rd Jun 2010, 10:46
Joined: 2003
Local Group: Marches
I've got such a short memory - already forgotten the pain and looking forward to next years. So glad I booked the week off work though as I keep having to have forty winks during the day - it feels like extreme jet lag. Actually quite sad its all over - was a tremendous atmosphere at the end.
Author: Peter Ibison
Posted: Thu 3rd Jun 2010, 8:08
Joined: 1998
Local Group: Staffordshire
I would like to thank the organisers and checkpointers for the wonderful event they provided over the Spring bank holiday weekend. The route gave us such lovely scenery all the way. I found the route description to be very clear and the `limited` refreshments at some checkpoints didn`t appear to be the case. A mention also to the band at the start for piping us on our way to add to the Scottish feel of the event. Thanks to all.

Peter
Posted: Wed 2nd Jun 2010, 16:09
Joined: 2001
I want to add my thanks and congatulations to the organisers for putting on a great event. The secenry was superb and the checkpoints were well organised. There were tedious sections, but I can accept those are difficult to avoid in an area with few alternative tracks. Anyway, even the cycle track had an amazing river to its left if you bothered to look.
Author: David Williams
Posted: Wed 2nd Jun 2010, 15:11
Joined: 1995
Local Group: South Wales
What a great event! It was well worth the long journey from Cardiff.
Many thanks to: the organisers, the marshals who were all very friendly and accommodating, and especially to Bobby and her First Aid colleague who attended to my poor feet at the finish.
Author: Elton Ellis
Posted: Wed 2nd Jun 2010, 13:57
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Surrey
Feet pretty well knackered: I've been on tiptoes (almost) for the past two days. I'm probably marshaling on the Sussex Stride.The Housman: yes, well, incurable optimism will probably overcome bitter and painful experience again.
Author: Julie Welch
Posted: Wed 2nd Jun 2010, 13:38
Joined: 1996
Local Group: London
Congrats, Elton - really pleased for you that you made it. How are your feet? The last I saw of them there looked to be some serious blisterage happening there!
Definitely see me at the Housman - and at the Sussx Strider, if you're going for that. Julie
Author: Elton Ellis
Posted: Wed 2nd Jun 2010, 12:51
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Surrey
That was tough luck, Julie. You were going well until that point. I hope to see you plodding along on the Housman 100.
Author: Julie Welch
Posted: Wed 2nd Jun 2010, 9:35
Joined: 1996
Local Group: London
Too tough for me. I had to drop out at 53 miles with hypothermia. My own stupid fault - I didn't stop to cover up when the first of the rain started. So disappointed - it was a lovely route. Very grateful to Isobel Falconer, who got me back to the breakfast stop for treatment, and to the East Lancs medical squad.
Author: Ian Sykes
Posted: Wed 2nd Jun 2010, 9:12
Joined: 1986
Local Group: East Yorkshire
I've been reading the results with much interest, after hearing that some of the organizes where criticised about the closing time of the last checkpoint. Out of the 352 walkers who finished, 160 took more then 1 hour to walk from the last checkpoint to the finish.

If I may suggest to any walker who feels that they know better then the people who give up so much time to put on walks any walks not just the Hundreds, come and help out. Give something back to the sport we all love. Then maybe you will realise what a hard and sometime's a thankless job it can be.

In my many year's of helping out on event's I have found that it's the one's who would never dream of helping out are the one's with the most to say how they should be organized. To me that say's everything. So please next time you are out on a event and you feel like complaining think twice, maybe bite your tongue and say thankyou instead.


Ian Sykes 8484.
Author: Ken Walker
Posted: Tue 1st Jun 2010, 22:47
Joined: 2009
Local Group: Heart of Scotland
Thank you to all the organisers for a fantastic first event. I really enjoyed it. I'm glad to read that other people found it to be tough. If everyone had told me at the end that this was one of the easy ones, I'd have cried!
I was one of the very few locals who took part - I live a mere 45 minutes away from Dunkeld. The excellent route descriptions meant that I was able to recce the odd section or two and I will certainly be back to run some bits again - just maybe not the bit from Errochty Dam to Kinloch Rannoch!
I cannot get over the standard set at the checkpoints. A very nice lady in Fortingall apologised that there wasn't waitress service. Waitress service in a challenge like this? To even consider it was beyond the call of duty! I'm truly impressed.
I've even managed to raise over £1,000 in sponsorship for Girlguiding Fife. It seemed appproriate to 'run' 100 miles in Guide centenary year. Thank you again for giving me the chance. Sue Walker.
Author: Garfield & Helen Southall
Posted: Tue 1st Jun 2010, 22:18
Joined: 1991
Local Group: Merseystride
Provisional results on the website !
http://www.heartofscotland100.org.uk/
(Garfield)
Author: Eileen Greenwood
Posted: Tue 1st Jun 2010, 22:00
Joined: 2002
Local Group: Yorkshire Coast
Marvellous! Very difficult. This 100 was my fourth successful 100 event. Tourists arriving into Dunkeld on Sunday/Monday morning must have thought the LDWA is an organsisation of zombies.. never have I seen so many limping/hobbling/shuffling/swaying and reeling folks!
I think blister plasters must dissolve in peat bogs. Even though I thought I was going to die and hated myself for doing it on the Sunday, my blister pain subsided (feet went numb!) and I enjoyed the event from the Aberfeldy checkpoint! A superb venue. As for the remote checkpoints with limited supplies.. what was limited? Plenty of hot drinks were there,hot soup and snacks and support and encouragement and sympathy!
Funniest sight but at the expense of those suffering sorry- was the view of 2 people with leaning sidewards syndrome- walking side by side, one was leaning to the right and the other to the left.. now if they had swapped postions they could have held each other upright!!
And thanks to the Aberfeldy folks who offered lifts to walkers (shufflers and leaners) thinking they were hospital cases. They were hospital cases but more like mental hospital cases!

One 100 event I won't forget! The camraderie was brilliant thank you all.
Author: Rebecca Lawrence
Posted: Tue 1st Jun 2010, 20:59
Joined: 2003
Local Group: Marches
Brilliant Event and most memorable of all the hundreds so far. So many highs and lows along the way. High points were realising that the burns were not anywhere near as full as they were in April, the sunshine and views to the right in the forest on Sunday evening, and the general comraderie of the event, and low points were the rain - it was so hard leaving checkpoints at night and seeing the stair rods outside, actually didn't mind the A9 cycle track as I was quite happy to switch off and plod, but I found the road stretch into fortigall so difficult I was nearly in tears, and another low point was vomiting after the breakfast stop. Cannot express enough thanks to everyone who assisted in this event. It was fantastic and also speaking to a lot of local people they really appreciated the extra revenue the event brought to the area. Well done
Author: Steve Platt
Posted: Tue 1st Jun 2010, 20:52
Joined: 2005
Local Group: London
A huge thank you to everyone involved in organising a very special event. From the sweepers who must have thought I was going to set some sort of record for early retirement by missing the cut-off time at Checkpoint 2 (a long, slightly embarrassing story) to the fine and friendly people I met at every stage of the journey - you were all wonderful and your different contributions greatly appreciated. Unfortunately I had to pull out at the 76-mile mark after over-estimating the pace at which I could cover the distance - that'll teach me! - but I hope to be back next year. Thanks again.
Author: Elton Ellis
Posted: Tue 1st Jun 2010, 13:24
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Surrey
One of the Greats. A Hundred is always challenging: this one fulfilled its promise, and more. Spectacular mountains and lochs, forests, riversides and pretty villages. High points were being able to reel away the miles on the tracks, coming down through the woods into Kinloch Rannoch, the sight of Schiehallion drawing ever closer, the friendly checkpoints and the welcome on arriving at the finish. Low point was the dreary rain at night along the everlasting cycle track. Tough stretches were heather bashing: along Loch Errochty and up the fence, and the diversion to Pheiginn Bothy. It all added to the experience of a really good Hundred.

Thanks to those who spent hundreds of hours preparing the event to ensure it all went without a hitch, and to the checkpointers who met us with smiles and encouragement, and their usual efficiency in getting us fed and watered.
Author: David Morgan
Posted: Tue 1st Jun 2010, 11:29
Joined: 1994
Local Group: South Wales
Well, I'm back after completing an excellent 100. 'Twas number 10 for me too, so an additional degree of satisfaction. The route passed through some stunning scenery, and despite the hardships of the sections between Errochty Dam and Phegeinn Bothy, I can safely say that whilst they were the hardest sections of any 100 I have completed, they were the most visually stunning, and the scenery carried me through.
Thanks so much to the organisers of the event. The food was excellent, the CP's placed at the right distances, and all in all, you created a memorable event. You even managed to arrange near perfect weather for the day sections. As for the 2 hours rain in the night, well that just concentrated the mind!!!!!
Author: David Powell
Posted: Thu 27th May 2010, 17:31
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Heart of England
Hi All
Did I see snow showers on the forecast for Saturday night- or was it frogs?
Author: Madeleine Watson
Posted: Wed 26th May 2010, 22:09
Joined: 2002
Local Group: West Yorkshire
I doubt anyone will have trouble finding the start. Dunkeld isn't that big! Cross the river heading north, and turn left into the square.

And as for breakfast and being orderly - we'll be in a state of half-dazedness I suspect, so could be in any state !

I've been slightly freaked by the changing weather forecast over this week. Heavy showers one day for Sunday, sunny showers the next. Saturday has remained at light showers. Guess we just have to be prepared for anything.
Author: Julie Welch
Posted: Wed 26th May 2010, 21:09
Joined: 1996
Local Group: London
Cold weather - brilliant. It's been too hot down in London to do anything much. Good luck everyone and see you in Dunkeld (always assuming I find the venue),
Author: Ken Falconer
Posted: Wed 26th May 2010, 20:29
Joined: 1983
Local Group: Heart of Scotland
To those Hundred participants still reading the Forum (I know that many are already up in the event locality), good luck and enjoy yourselves, whether walking or helping. It is still quite cold in the area with temperatures dropping to freezing at night, so don't forget to take enough warm clothing. I look forward to seeing everyone there!
Author: John King
Posted: Wed 26th May 2010, 19:41
Joined: 2002
I am on my way

Good Luck all
JohnK
Author: Garfield & Helen Southall
Posted: Wed 26th May 2010, 18:18
Joined: 1991
Local Group: Merseystride
Peter, see the Final Instructions on the website (look in "Latest News" for link).
The Drill Hall, and Duchess Anne Church Hall, are in the square just off the main street.
We didn't have breakfast on the Marshals' Walk, as a flooded venue at Blair Atholl scuppered that idea!

Hope all goes well, Helen and I'll be at HQ entering times into the finishing spreadsheet.

Garfield
Author: Peter Haslam
Posted: Wed 26th May 2010, 17:15
Joined: 1992
Local Group: East Lancashire
Sorting out the final arrangements for the journey north, and just realised I have no idea where the start is. The GR is just a point on the map, is it a school? or a hall? or is it that small a place it will be obvious? Hopefully see you all at the start then at breakfast. Do try to space yourselves out and get to breakfast in an orderly fashion. Good luck everyone
Author: Rebecca Lawrence
Posted: Wed 26th May 2010, 13:26
Joined: 2003
Local Group: Marches
Good luck everyone who's doing the event this weekend and hope everything goes smoothly for the organisers. Hope some of you will be staying in Dunkeld on Monday night for a few pints in celebration (hopefully!) We're at the Athol Arms so hope to see some of you after the event in the bar.
Author: Ian Sykes
Posted: Mon 24th May 2010, 14:02
Joined: 1986
Local Group: East Yorkshire
Ian, There is a lot to said for the tortoise and the hare approach to the hundreds. The last few I did, I tried to start at the back and then work my way through the field. That way with a bit of luck you will always have a target to aim for. You will be surprised by how many hare's you can pass by doing it that way.

Ian Sykes 8484.
Author: Ian Koszalinski
Posted: Mon 24th May 2010, 12:49
Joined: 2004
Local Group: High Peak
hi ian. i held back on the northumberland and was able to run in at the end.injuries permiting i'll finish i don't think of miles i think of checkpoints
Author: Ian Sykes
Posted: Sun 23rd May 2010, 21:35
Joined: 1986
Local Group: East Yorkshire
Ian thankyou for getting back.

You state you did the Northumberland 100 in 45 hours. But was the Northumberland 100 spot on 100 miles? So just maybe you walked the Northumberland 101 or 102 who knows?

All the 100's I walked I took it that I was walking 100 miles and set my mind to that. The Cleveland 100 was 100 miles until I was told at the finish that it was 104. The Yorkshire 100 was a 100 miles until John told us it was maybe 105 or 106. Still do not know the true mileage of that walk. And to be honest I don't care to know.

How many past hundreds have been 100 miles. In the days before GPS and the like it must have been hard to judge the true mileage.

I do believe all this hype about the mileage on the Heart of Scotland 100 is maybe getting out of hand. I would guess most of the 100 walkers will just shrug there shoulders and get on with it in the knowledge that the organises of the 100 have done there very best to make sure you all enjoy a good weekend of walking and that as many as possible will finish.

Wishing you, Ian the best of luck for next week. I'll be there at the end to clap you in well before the 48 hour time limit, with a bit of luck.

Ian Sykes 8484.
Author: Ian Koszalinski
Posted: Sun 23rd May 2010, 19:13
Joined: 2004
Local Group: High Peak
ian, i'm from yorkshire so we're more down to earth, i finished the northumberland in 45hrs the extra 5 miles would mean another 2hrs that makes it 47hrs i'm a few years older now and would be miffed if i completed the challenge set by the LDWA of 100 miles in 48 hrs but considered a failure if i didn't complete the course, it goes without saying that my aim is to finish the course well within the 48hrs
Author: Garfield & Helen Southall
Posted: Sun 23rd May 2010, 16:16
Joined: 1991
Local Group: Merseystride
Best of luck, David - and to all our forum regulars.
Us Marshals and Organisers are girding our loins for long shifts, random events and (hopefully) lots of laughs!
Take care, y'all.
(Garfield)
Posted: Sun 23rd May 2010, 15:07
Joined: 1982
This will be my last posting for at least two weeks. The caravan is packed, the car is ready and we head for Pitlochery tomorrow morning (I say by 07:30 but suspect that SWMBO has her eye on 09:00)
My 100’s kit is ready, yet as normal I would like more time to prepare but the whistle has blown and its time to get ready to get out of the trench. So just in case I forget or do not get the chance next weekend, I will take this opportunity say thank you to the organisers, the job you took on was horrendous and most of us would have turned chicken at the thought of it. To those that did the Marshalls walk and those that have reconnoitred the route, thank you for your feed back, I am sure that it will be invaluable to the rest of us. To the Marshalls and helpers on the C.P’s If I appear even more grumpy than normal, please give me a little lea way, I really do appreciate what you are doing and don’t mean to be a grouch. To my fellow challengers Good Luck and remember Ego Ambulamus (oh’ just in case that last bit is wrong, we did not study Latin at school and English was considered to be a second language to Geordie)
Author: Ken Falconer
Posted: Sun 23rd May 2010, 11:28
Joined: 1983
Local Group: Heart of Scotland
As is normal on Hundreds, the closing times of checkpoints are set to ensure that everyone who leaves each checkpoint before its closing time (and the rules require this) is likely to finish the entire route within 48 hours. Should anyone decide to retire at Rumbling Bridge then their certificate will say that they completed 101.75 miles in 46hs 3mins (or whatever time) and in the results they will be recorded as retiring rather than completing the event.
Author: Ian Sykes
Posted: Sun 23rd May 2010, 10:18
Joined: 1986
Local Group: East Yorkshire
I think you are talking yourself into failure by saying you will not finish the course as laid down within the time limit. If you did not know that the course was slightly over the stated mileage you would have walked it with no problems. It's all about mind over matter. I also believe all who take part have a responsibly to be fit enough to walk the set course within the time limit.

OK I know I'm out of step with the rank and file within the LDWA. but I do believe as walkers you also have a duty to the organizes of this event.

Ian Sykes. 8484.
Author: Ian Koszalinski
Posted: Sat 22nd May 2010, 22:41
Joined: 2004
Local Group: High Peak
i'll bring this up now don't want to cause a scene if i get to the end, what would happen if you completed the challenge of 100 miles within 48hrs but completed the course past the 48hrs time limit ?
Author: Philip Clarke
Posted: Sat 22nd May 2010, 18:52
Joined: 1995
Local Group: Marches
If anyone is looking for accommodation on the Friday night I have a room booked in Pitlochry (4 beds), unfortunately I am going to miss the 100 (105!) this year so I no longer require it. Contact me on 07973957760 for details.
Author: Elton Ellis
Posted: Fri 21st May 2010, 19:01
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Surrey
For those who haven’t looked, Merrian’s recce and marshals’ walk photos are also on the HoS100 website, showing scenery and aspects of the character of the route. The photo of Schiehallion especially is impressive: a sleeping giant in the mist and snow: beautiful.

Also good to see the shots of wear and tear on Dave’s feet: it’s bad enough that he waltzes through the route in 27 hours looking almost as chipper when he finishes as he did when he started: that he should do it with pristine feet would be just too much.
Author: Garfield & Helen Southall
Posted: Fri 21st May 2010, 13:29
Joined: 1991
Local Group: Merseystride
Karen,
There was a promotional offer with SatMap that included the Heart of Scotland route (as on the Harveys map) in with the offer. Perhaps you can contact SatMap and get one sent to you.
Also, search "Satmap" in the top-right of this page.
Alternatively, I'm sure there are other SatMap users out there who could send you their file.
(Garfield)
Author: Karen Jarvis Morgan
Posted: Fri 21st May 2010, 10:56
Joined: 2005
Local Group: West Yorkshire
Just wondered if anyone could help 'el thicko'. Ive got a Satmap and successfully uploaded the old gpx file, however when I try uploading the v2 with the amended route it just shows a straight line saying 33.1mile...could anyone possibly help me or email a version I can use karen.jarvis@prsprinters.co.uk...thanks and see ya all there.
Author: Albert Bowes
Posted: Thu 20th May 2010, 17:56
Joined: 1990
Local Group: Cleveland
Hi Louise

Rest assured your 'two in one' would be acceptable at the kit check.

Eva Bowes - Organising Committee, Heart of Scotland 100
Author: Louise Whittaker
Posted: Tue 18th May 2010, 22:48
Joined: 1994
Local Group: Staffordshire
Question about two of the the mandated items for the first aid kit which are: adhesive dressing and low adherent dressing. Boots Pharmacy was perplexed and I have come away with a pack of 5 x adhesive wound dressings which cpmprise a low adherent sterile rectangular pad in the centre with adhesive material around the edges to remove the necessity for the low adherent pad to be taped. Boots thought this product was essentially the two mandated items rolled into one!
So please can someone just give me a nod - that when I turn up with the aforementioned pack - it will be considered as 'two in one' and be accepted as such at any kit check I might undergo.

Thank you.
Author: Al Rodger
Posted: Tue 18th May 2010, 12:39
Joined: 1999
Local Group: Dorset
Be mindful that Perthshire has biting insects other than the famous Highland midge - but the first Highland midge of a summer crawls out of her bed (Yes, it is the female of the species that bites! She does it for the kids, you know.) at the end of May or early June, hungry for a slurp of human blood.
In past years there has been a Midge Forecast in the local paper (Press & Journal) but it's just a one-day forecast. To me, it's never looked very useful or accurate (then my main Highland experience is East Sutherland which is pretty much midge-free). The web site http://www.midgeforecast.co.uk/2008/ looks like the same forecast but it remains blank at the moment as the midge season has yet to begin (& the .../2008/ is a bit ominous.) The vox pop on their twitter link is active but, as ever, of unknown provenance.
On balance I'd suggest the following warning – REMEMBER to pack insect repellent – although, given the cold winter/spring & not being West coast, participants in the Heart of Scotland 100 will likely be deprived of the world famous Highland midge experience. What a terrible shame!
Author: Deirdre Flegg
Posted: Mon 17th May 2010, 21:40
Joined: 1993
Local Group: Dorset
best laugh all day-thanks. Won't comment on any gender issues...
Posted: Mon 17th May 2010, 21:12
Joined: 1982
A very dainty one with loads of flowers and ribbons on it.
Author: Deirdre Flegg
Posted: Mon 17th May 2010, 19:20
Joined: 1993
Local Group: Dorset
Could someone tell me how active the midges are likely to be? Busy choosing which hat to bring..
Author: Elton Ellis
Posted: Sat 15th May 2010, 22:09
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Surrey
Thanks, Garfield, and thanks also to Tony W for his notes on the tricky bits. Very helpful.
Author: Garfield & Helen Southall
Posted: Sat 15th May 2010, 17:53
Joined: 1991
Local Group: Merseystride
Louise - nothing sinister. Last time I numbered the files; this time I didn't! You'll have to shuffle them into the right sequence once printed - you know, Dunkeld to Loch Ordie, Loch Ordie to Kirkmichael, Kirkmichael to Daldhu etc. (Garfield)
Author: Louise Whittaker
Posted: Sat 15th May 2010, 16:57
Joined: 1994
Local Group: Staffordshire
A big thank you for posting the final route (version 4). I've just checked out the ZIP file. Version 3 numbered the stages, which also appeared in the right order. Version 4 - the stages are not numbered and are not in the right order. Its easy to unravel - this is not a moan! - but just checking that this doesn't mean something sinister has happened to the precious route notes.
and - thank you again.
Author: Garfield & Helen Southall
Posted: Sat 15th May 2010, 13:10
Joined: 1991
Local Group: Merseystride
If I can answer for Ken, Elton, the latest RD mainly concerns the Loch Ordie to Kirkmichael section, but also has a revision in the final stage from Rumbling Bridge to the Finish, which is to avoid the recent landslip.
We've also incorporated the Pheiginn Bothy re-route from earlier, and updated CP times etc.
Garfield
Author: Elton Ellis
Posted: Sat 15th May 2010, 12:36
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Surrey
Ken
Are the changes just to the Loch Ordie to Kirk Michael section, or are there others as well?
Thanks
Elton
Author: Geoff Deighton
Posted: Sat 15th May 2010, 11:54
Joined: 1981
Local Group: High Peak
My last question has just been answered! Details are now on the Heart of Scotland website.
Author: Geoff Deighton
Posted: Sat 15th May 2010, 10:46
Joined: 1981
Local Group: High Peak
Do we know when the final details will be issued? We're going up to Scotland this coming week and I'm concerned that we won't be at home to receive them or to print them off.
Author: Ken Falconer
Posted: Fri 14th May 2010, 19:49
Joined: 1983
Local Group: Heart of Scotland
Those who will soon be walking the 100 will be glad to know that, as a result of valiant efforts over the past four weeks by Perth & Kinross Countryside Trust and landowners, the path from Loch Oisinneach Beag through to Kirkmichael has been reinstated and waymarked and the deer fences now have gates in them. Those who recced the route earlier on will find it a great improvement and those who did the Marshals' Walk will be envious of those on the main event on this section! A revised route description is about to be circulated.
Author: Al Rodger
Posted: Fri 14th May 2010, 13:32
Joined: 1999
Local Group: Dorset
Moon rise on the Saturday is a few minutes before midnight & the moon will be full. So a good clear stary stary night will be at its best only for a couple of hours after sunset.
Author: Merrian Lancaster
Posted: Fri 14th May 2010, 8:53
Joined: 1996
Local Group: Beds, Bucks and Northants
You’re right Al, “long clear nights” is totally wrong – made sense to me at the time. Fingers crossed for short clear nights with early rise of huge bright moon. I’m hoping to see loads of stars at CP7, will I get that if the moon is bright?
Author: Al Rodger
Posted: Thu 13th May 2010, 22:16
Joined: 1999
Local Group: Dorset
Re - "long clear nights"
Sunset will be 2150hrs, sunrise 0430hrs & the summer twilight is long that far North. So don't plan for a 'long' night. Very very few will be caught having to navigate down to Shinagag in the dark. Beyond Shinagag the navigating is trivial for quite some way.
Author: Mark Dalton
Posted: Thu 13th May 2010, 21:11
Joined: 2009
Local Group: Nidderdale
Re: Rob's post from the 11th - he's sorted now but in case it might help anyone else out using Garmin Mapsource.......Thought i'd post what i ended up doing.

Once you've downloaded the source file to your GPS you can edit the track & apply a filter that will allow you to reduce the number of waypoints from the dflt of >1000 (in the case of the HOS file) to a lesser number. A lesser number in my case that would then let me download the file to my Garmin ETRex H - which as per Robs GPS could only deal with a finite number of Waypoints.

I've now got the HOS stored on my GPS as 1 x route.

Looking forward to this one.......Never been to this area b4 and the Marshalls report's I've read on the forum has whetted my appetite somewhat.....Just need to rid my achy legs of last weeks Fellsman event in the Yorkshire Dales....This'll be my very first 100miler & I'm planning to run the vast majority of it - stopping of course for a chinwag with everyone who i pass (or who passes me!). Should be a good 'un......

Cheers

Mark....
Author: George Foxton
Posted: Thu 13th May 2010, 17:16
Joined: 1984
Local Group: East Lancashire
I know nothing about GPX files or tracklogs, but a little bit about ospreys.
Ospreys usually build their nests high in the forks of large trees, and are not as vulnerable to disturbance as ground nesting species. In some areas of the USA, where there are few natural nesting sites, they are more than happy to take up residence on artificial nest platforms in supermarket car parks etc. I can't see that there should be a problem on the 100, and just hope to see them.
Author: Merrian Lancaster
Posted: Thu 13th May 2010, 17:14
Joined: 1996
Local Group: Beds, Bucks and Northants
Isn't it true that after about 30 miles (probably a bit more in Scotland), it is night for someone on every bit of a 100 route? The checkpoint opening times bear that out.

Shinagag cp is open Sat 16:45 - 23:50, so I guess some folk could be doing that bit in the dark.

Let's hope for long, clear nights.
Author: Tony Willey
Posted: Thu 13th May 2010, 15:16
Joined: 1989
Local Group: Lakeland
I don't think the technology is going to be a great help on this Hundred. On the Marshals Walk navigation was generally straightforward and I found the route description extremely accurate. I can only recall a handfull of problems:-

1. I made a bit of a pig's ear of the section from Lochan Oisinneach to Kirkmichael. I probably turned away from the Lochan too early. Found trees and a gate in a wall, but I was too far left and it was the wrong tree/gate/wall. After the (correct) gate the path through the heather has been mown and is quite clear. The descent to Balchrochan was a bit tricky and more complex than the route description suggested - and we had to climb over a deer fence. This should all be sorted by the time of the event.
2. In the dark I lost the path completely on the way to Shinagag where the route description says "becoming indistinct around GR NN957690". Since we did not have a checkpoint there I solved the problem by taking a GPS fix on the track to the West and heading straight across the burn. On the main event you should not have the same problem as you will be doing this in daylight.
3. Peter Shick and I went wrong in the wood after NN820661. I believe others had a problem here. A fallen tree obscured the line of the path and we finished too low down in the wood.

Carrying the latest technology has it's own problems. At one checkpoint I was tucking into my food and cuppa while one of my fellow walkers was hunting for a power point to recharge his array of gadgets!
Author: Elton Ellis
Posted: Thu 13th May 2010, 11:51
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Surrey
Anyone using only a GPSr for following the route is asking for problems. The GPSr cannot tell you to take the left-hand gate of the three facing you, or to go on the left-hand side or the right hand side of the fence. At a junction of tracks, it will tell you if you have taken the wrong one, but only when you're 100 yards past the junction. After 95 miles, I am very loath to walk 200 yards extra. You really do need to refer to the route description. I use my Garmin for backup only – and even then feel it is cheating a little.

Downloading the route to a GPSr: I plotted the route on Tracklogs 1:25k by copying the route from the free 1:50k map, then tweaked it using the description. Then I uploaded it to my Garmin. Much more fun than trying to get it from someone else and also you become acquainted with the description and the areas of possible “getting lost”, like the night section after Blair Atholl.

Slightly off topic, it is really good to read a night section route description of a 5.8 mile leg comprising only 5 lines of text. No squinting at the text trying to avoid the glare of the plastic casing in your headlamp, trying to find your place, then trying to set a bearing on your compass. Just get on the cycle track and stay on it to the next checkpoint. Great.
Author: Louise Whittaker
Posted: Wed 12th May 2010, 17:57
Joined: 1994
Local Group: Staffordshire
Hello Tony, I was wondering if you are participating in the 105 - in which case may I draw your attention to:

'Tony is now on the Amber list of participants, and is given special status.

It is illegal for participants, however well intentioned their motives, to disturb the route, especially at this late stage. Anyone found guilty of route disturbance is liable to be punished by a wee dip in a wee Loch.'
Author: Edith Moran
Posted: Wed 12th May 2010, 17:06
Joined: 1986
Local Group: Cleveland
Robbie Gordon of Perth & Kinross Countryside Trust told me of the osprey's nest last week. I have put a note in the route description asking walkers to pass quietly in order to minimise disturbance. It is very unfortunate that the bird has chosen to nest by the side of our route, something which we could not have foreseen and given the nature of the countryside cannot avoid as there are no other tracks.
Author: Antony Blatchford
Posted: Wed 12th May 2010, 11:46
Joined: 2019
Local Group: Lakeland
Without wishing to be alarmist, I have just read the report of the Marshall’s walk and there may be a potential problem which might be worth investigating.
Ospreys are on the Amber list of birds in the UK, and are given special protection status. It is illegal for event organisers, however well intentioned their motives, to hold an event which disturbs a protected bird from nesting activities, especially during the breeding season. Event organisers are instructed to take all actions possible to reduce the risk of disturbance, e.g. changing the route away from the nest.
Anyone found guilty of disturbance is liable to be punished in law, potentially risking a fine.
Whilst I don’t know the full ins and outs of the legal situation, if an osprey is nesting close to the path, having 500 walkers going past the nest could be construed as an act of disturbance and therefore potentially leave the organisers open to criminal charges, especially as the presence of the osprey is now known.
It might be worthwhile getting some advice on this matter, as I am sure the last thing anyone wants is for the LDWA to be accused of disturbing a protected species of bird, or even worse, the organisers facing criminal prosecution.
Apologies if I am raising an issue which has already been addressed, but I thought it best to flag this up now rather than say nothing and the LDWA getting into trouble.
Author: Garfield & Helen Southall
Posted: Tue 11th May 2010, 22:09
Joined: 1991
Local Group: Merseystride
Alan, we were even more devious! The data came from a variety of "on site" recordings, and "armchair" re-routings, all put into Tracklogs and then joined together.
Personally, I would only use a GPX file for key waypoints. And, as we state on the website, ALWAYS in conjunction with the Route Description.
(Garfield)
Posted: Tue 11th May 2010, 21:15
Joined: 2009
Thanks for the replies folks :)
I'm working away at the moment but will get my good lady to stick a SAE in the post for the map and will try the GPX file via mapsource when I get home.
Cheers
Author: Alan Greenwood
Posted: Tue 11th May 2010, 21:08
Joined: 1998
Local Group: Calderdale
Hi Garfield
I had no such problems with my Garmin Oregon 400t. This takes 10000 trackpoints and the GPX file for the 100 is just short of 1500. Your comments about how long ago the file was created is helpful and suggests you might have created it from your armchair rather than walking the route. As the use of satellite navigation is becoming more prevalent it might be considered good practice to say when the file was created and how it was created. This is something that I had previously not considered but will be doing so in future for my groups challenge events.
I will be using my GPS to navigate the 100 following your file amended for route changes but will have the route description handy just in case.
Author: Garfield & Helen Southall
Posted: Tue 11th May 2010, 20:16
Joined: 1991
Local Group: Merseystride
Apologies, Rob, for that. The GPX was actually created quite a while ago to generate the path for Harveys to do the 1:50,000 free map. This was about 15 months ago, and was done with very fine accuracy so that the resulting map would be clear. Most devices can take this level of detail, but there some that can't. (Garfield)
Author: Rob Richardson
Posted: Tue 11th May 2010, 19:19
Joined: 1986
Local Group: South Wales
I hope others have more luck than me in downloading the route via Mapsource onto my Garmin GPS. I can only download the first 32.32 miles of the route before getting a 'track truncated' message. I have tried downloading the route from Grough, but get exactly the same problem. I understand it is due to the large number of data points in the route. I am told this can be overcome by splitting the route into more manageable chunks, however I have given up on this approach and have downloaded each leg from the route I created in MemoryMap. I have also printed the route in 1:25k from Grough and am very impressed with the results.
Author: Alan Greenwood
Posted: Tue 11th May 2010, 8:25
Joined: 1998
Local Group: Calderdale
Sorry Garfield had not seen your post before I did mine. Robin must be well pleased with the response.
Author: Alan Greenwood
Posted: Tue 11th May 2010, 8:21
Joined: 1998
Local Group: Calderdale
Hi Robin
Yes of course it is possible to transfer the GPX file to your GPS and then use satellite navigation to keep yourself on the track. Getting the file onto your GPS is not too difficult and if you have a Garmin you get software which comes with the unit to do this called MapSource. Just a word of warning. You are reliant on getting the correct track to start with because everytime the route description changes the GPX file needs changing and organisers are not really up to scratch with this (over to you Garfield). It is possible to try and alter the GPX file yourself and hope you get it right but often the changes can move away from rights of way.
If you are interested in taking this further send me an email to alan@alangreenwood.biz
Someone else will have to answer your map question.
Author: Garfield & Helen Southall
Posted: Tue 11th May 2010, 8:02
Joined: 1991
Local Group: Merseystride
Hi Robin - welcome to the forums !

First, you'll need a program on your PC or Mac to push the GPX file onto your Garmin device. You'll also need an appropriate connecting lead, unless it uses Bluetooth. On the Mac I use LoadMyTracks, and I use Tracklogs on the PC. But there are many others.

There is a 1:50,000 centered map already available, free of charge. Send a Double-stamped A5 SAE to :-
Edith Moran
1 Priory Grove,
Redcar
TS10 1QT

Best wishes for the event!

(Garfield)
Posted: Tue 11th May 2010, 3:11
Joined: 2009
Hi folks first time poster,
I was wondering about a couple of things, firstly the GPX data I found on the HOS website, can I use this on a garmin GPS and how would I transfer that data over?
Also with regards to a route specific map, is it possible to get the full route on an OS 1:50,000 map and if so what grid reference do you centre it on so it all fits in?

anyway sorry for being a pest and looking forward to the event.
Cheers
Author: Edith Moran
Posted: Mon 10th May 2010, 8:53
Joined: 1986
Local Group: Cleveland
There will be a final route description issued very shortly. This is to take account of the improvements being made to the path between Loch Ordie and Kirkmichael, some of which had been done for the marshals' walk, but still work in progress. Ken has kindly offered to go and look at this and let me have the final route description for this section on Friday. I think it better to issue this before the event than a separate sheet on the day.
There will also be a document for final instructions regarding parking, booking in etc.
Paper documents will be sent to those who are not on line.
Author: Merrian Lancaster
Posted: Sat 8th May 2010, 16:20
Joined: 1996
Local Group: Beds, Bucks and Northants
Photos from recce and marshals' walk.
Author: David Morgan
Posted: Fri 7th May 2010, 22:00
Joined: 1994
Local Group: South Wales
Thanks very much Garfield. Great info.

David
Author: Julie Welch
Posted: Fri 7th May 2010, 19:15
Joined: 1996
Local Group: London
Thanks for the good advice. So it's road shoes, and extra strong lighting for the heather-bashing.
Author: John King
Posted: Fri 7th May 2010, 11:10
Joined: 2002
Looks Like my choice of a Grippy, quick drying road shoe could be the right choice then:-)
Author: Tony Willey
Posted: Fri 7th May 2010, 11:02
Joined: 1989
Local Group: Lakeland
Julie,
I would go for comfort. The vast majority of the mileage is on tarmac, good tracks or smooth grass. Plenty of heather between Loch Errochty and Pheiginn Bothy - no grip problems but often difficult to see where you were putting your feet. On the marshals walk there was virtually no mud and I would have finished with dry feet had it not been for the small matter of burn crossings. Could be different if it rains a lot in the next 3 weeks, but this would be my advice based on last weekend's conditions.
Author: Julie Welch
Posted: Fri 7th May 2010, 10:53
Joined: 1996
Local Group: London
Maybe someone who did the marshals' walk or who has recce'd can help with advice here. I do events in either Inov8 Flyrocs or Nike Air Maxes, depending on how much road/concrete/tarmac/baked mud there is. (Sorry - I do realise this sounds like an attempt at product placement, but it ain't.) The Flyrocs have much better traction, and by the look of some of the terrain pictured in Garfield's photos they'd be the better choice. But the Air Maxes are cushioned - much kinder to my decrepit knees - and while a lot of people on the Yoredale 100 suffered the effects of the stony tracks my feet were about the only part of my body at the end that were in perfect nick. To cut to the chase - traction or cushioning? I'd much rather wear road-running shoes because of the comfort factor but will I spend a lot of the time sliding around and falling over?
Author: Garfield & Helen Southall
Posted: Thu 6th May 2010, 12:21
Joined: 1991
Local Group: Merseystride
Dave,
Right-click the filename to download it.
Some systems append an "XML" suffix, if so, remove it, to leave just the ".GPX" extension.
Garfield
Author: David Morgan
Posted: Thu 6th May 2010, 10:57
Joined: 1994
Local Group: South Wales
Hi Garfield,

Thanks for this information. I found the link and opened it to be confronted with what looked like HTML code. How do I go about actually saving a gpx track to my computer?

Regards,

Dave
Author: Garfield & Helen Southall
Posted: Thu 6th May 2010, 10:01
Joined: 1991
Local Group: Merseystride
David,
There is a GPX file on the event website http://www.heartofscotland100.org.uk/
Go to the Route tab, then select the first "here" link.
This GPX was prepared before the recent changes to the route at Errochty Dam and Pheiginn Bothy, so you'll need to modify the file in line with route description. (Garfield)
Author: David Morgan
Posted: Thu 6th May 2010, 8:32
Joined: 1994
Local Group: South Wales
Does anyone have a GPX file of the route? If so, would you be willing to email it to me so that I can upload in preparation for the event?

The email address that it can be sent to is:

morgs4mountains3402@hotmail.com

Thanks in anticipation.

Dave
Author: Louise Whittaker
Posted: Wed 5th May 2010, 22:57
Joined: 1994
Local Group: Staffordshire
Thank you for the 'appetisers' - sounds a stunning route. Are the route descriptions on the HoS website, and the gxp files the final versions? This is my first 100, so I'd like to be clutching the right instructions! Thank you.
Author: Tony Willey
Posted: Tue 4th May 2010, 17:26
Joined: 1989
Local Group: Lakeland
That was quite a walk, which Ken has summarised very well. The Marshals walk started from Aberfeldy whereas the main event begins 18 miles further down the route in Dunkeld, and this probably changed the character of the walk quite a bit. The first half of the walk was generally on good surfaces with easy navigation and no steep climbs and as usual I was seduced into walking faster than was wise. A further incentive to crack on was to get as close to Blair Atholl as possible before dark, as there were references in the route description to “path becoming indistinct” in the section after Daldhu. I didn’t quite make it and was glad to have have my GPS as backup after losing the path.
There was more easy walking between Calvine and Loch Errochty, which made the subsequent sections more of a shock. Sixteen miles and 3500 feet of climbing between the loch and Pheiginn Bothy with a good helping of heather bashing and burn crossing was quite a challenge with 72 miles already completed. After the col before the bothy it was almost literally downhill all the way on good surfaces to the finish.
The main event will be more evenly balanced with the tough sections tackled earlier and in daylight for most people. The last third of the event is without major problems and should provide a relatively easy finish for weary legs. Despite the tough sections and extra distance forced on the organisers, I think it will still be quite a quick route thanks to the absence of stiles and gates and mostly good surfaces to walk on. My time was bang in the middle of my previous Hundred times.
Highlights? The walk up to Loch Ordie was beautiful as was Loch Errochty in the sunshine of Sunday morning, but nothing can quite match the experience of walking into the night from Daldhu, totally alone among the huge mountains. Magic!
Author: John King
Posted: Mon 3rd May 2010, 20:50
Joined: 2002
Thanks Ken
That`s my appetite well and truly whetted,(in more ways than one) I hope there is Cloutie Dumpling and Haggis available for us, I love both.
The terrain sounds superb and just what i expected, I have completed plotting the route and have come up with 105.42 miles of walking on my favorite terrain in the world , can`t wait.
Thanks all for the hard work by the good folk that have pulled the HOS 100+ together

Ok Tony I will look out for yo guy`s at the Fellsman
Good Luck all
JohnK
Author: Ken Falconer
Posted: Mon 3rd May 2010, 15:20
Joined: 1983
Local Group: Heart of Scotland
For some reason, there seems to be a lot of interest in how the Marshals' 100 went, and a number of people have asked for me for a few details, so putting up a forum post will save several emails.

Firstly, tremendous thanks to those who organised the Marshals' walk, in particular Edith, Eva, Paul and John. Although it's on a much smaller scale than the main event, the logistics of running 13 checkpoints for long periods is still very considerable. Everything seemed to go like clockwork and I'm sure this bodes well for the main event at the end of May. Similarly, grateful thanks to the checkpointers, not least to those who ran outdoor checkpoints in temperatures that dropped to below freezing overnight. The range of food certainly satisfied my own needs - the cloutie dumpling and locally made bread as well as the haggis at the finish deserve particular mention!

Of the 27 that started the walk and 23 finished, an 85% completion rate. There was light rain for most of Saturday which occasionally got heavier and with a short hail shower. The mountain tops were in cloud for most of the day, but it cleared on Saturday evening to give a very cold but beautifully starlit night. Sunday dawned with clear views of near and distant mountains topped with fresh snow. It continued dry throughout Sunday with another cold night. There was very little wind throughout the walk.

Most walkers recorded overall times not very different from their usual times for Hundreds. Many of the sections involved very easy walking along good tracks or lanes with easy navigation, and this allowed a good pace. This was compensated for by a few cross country stretches of tussocky heather and wet sphagnum bog, with the ground saturated following the recent rain and snow. Here most walkers made slower progress than they anticipated, particularly on the sections either side of Kinloch Rannoch. There was a general consensus that these sections were 'tough', and some walkers were obviously surprised just how rough it was, but after all this is typical Scottish terrain! There was little difficulty in crossing the burns, though you needed boots to keep dry feet.

Wildlife was abundant, with reports of deer, hare, grouse, curlew, and oyster catchers, to name but a few, and some walkers were lucky enough to see an osprey fly into its nest close to the path.

So for those on the main walk, prepare yourself mentally for the rough patches, enjoy the surroundings, and enjoy the hospitality that the organisers and helpers are working hard to provide - we'll do our best for you!
Author: Ian Sykes
Posted: Sat 1st May 2010, 8:35
Joined: 1986
Local Group: East Yorkshire
I have just found this forum in the last few days and I feel that I have to say somethink about the mileage on the 100's

I was on the Cleveland 100. Still one of the best in my opinion. OK so it was 104 so what, Thanks cleveland group for making the fun last longer.

I was on the White Rose Marshals walk. It took me 2 hours more than I planned, I was overjoyed when John told us at the end that it was 106+ miles long. It meant I was not slowing down in my old age.

It takes years to organize a 100, and I for one are only to pleased that groups do it. Most 100 walkers will take the extra miles in there stride. Most of us do/did 100's for fun. To all the people who are upset about the mileage of the 100. All I will say to then. Just be thankfull that groups put then on and stop whinging will you.

RE drinking beer on the 100's. Nothing better then a bar meal and a few beers in your belly as you enter the night.


With THANKS to all who planed and helped out on the 100's I did, and yes the one's I did not finnish as well.

thankyou ian sykes. f8484.
Author: Ian Sykes
Posted: Sat 1st May 2010, 7:38
Joined: 1986
Local Group: East Yorkshire
Good luck to all on the Marshals walk this weekend, especially to Dennis on his 17th. One day he might see sense and stop.

Ian,edith,john.
Author: Tony Deall
Posted: Fri 30th Apr 2010, 21:09
Joined: 1985
Local Group: Cumbria
See you on the Fellsman John.
There are at least four of us doing it as final prep for the 100 - we hope!
Myself and Tony Richmond from Penrith, Wendy Armitage and Eileen Greenwood from Scarborough.
Author: John King
Posted: Fri 30th Apr 2010, 11:21
Joined: 2002
Are there any other HOS entrants doing the Fellsman as a Warm up next weekend.

On the Mental approach to covering a hundred miles on foot theme, as I said in an earlier post I never start, thinking about the total distance, but only the distance to the next CP and i seldom think beyond the next 10 miles or so, that seems to give me the ability to stay focused on moving forward without negative vibes creeping in about distance still to do.

Anyway if you are on the Fellsman i will look out for you as you speed of into the distance :-)
Author: Peter Haslam
Posted: Thu 29th Apr 2010, 19:56
Joined: 1992
Local Group: East Lancashire
I completed the first 100 I tried, The Downsman in 1997. With travelling so far and the train not booked untill Monday afternoon there was little alternative. The next year however was much closer to home, in Buxton, my bag went missing at breakfast so I was delayed, grumpy and walking on my own on the Sunday morning, I also had this nagging pain in my knee after 60 miles. I limped into the 70 mile CP at around 2mph thinking, 30 miles left, at least 15 hours of nagging knee pain plus assorted blisters, or drop out and be home for tea. Alf Barker my East Lancs 100 mentor always said the 100 is 10% leg work 90% head work.
Author: Garfield & Helen Southall
Posted: Thu 29th Apr 2010, 18:00
Joined: 1991
Local Group: Merseystride
I, too, start to doubt the wisdom of a 100-miler at around 75-miles. I have found that a 10-15 minute power-nap at this point does the trick. This, accompanied by something to build the blood-sugar levels back up, usually does the trick. The last few miles, however, always seem so long! The section through the woods heading back towards the school at the end of the Wessex 100 seemed to go on forever. (Garfield)
Author: Rebecca Lawrence
Posted: Thu 29th Apr 2010, 17:22
Joined: 2003
Local Group: Marches
I always find that when I do a 25m challenge event I've had enough at 20m, a 40miler I'm shattered at 35 and 100K I've had enough at 55m which suggests the point at which fatigue sets in is variable depending on how far the walk is, which suggests there is a huge mental element to where and when fatigue sets in. Normally I hit my 'wall' on the 100m between 70 and 80m. Once I've got passed the magic 80 I know I've pretty much cracked it, but the golden rule for me is to see it as a series of short walks. If I get to 30m, and think I've got another 70 to go I would likely to give up there and then. Its just about making it to the next checkpoint. On the recent Dorset Giant I found negative thoughts creeping in when I got to about 30m and started thinking 'I'm not even half way yet and I'm shattered' - I had to quickly banish those thoughts or get into a negative state of mind.

The difficulty for me will be keeping a positive state of mind when I inevitably hit my wall at 75m knowing that the 100 is actually 104m - I'm not complaining about this as it is what it is, but I know at the time this will be a mentally tough prospect to work through.

Your right Elton - the DG was a stark reminder of how hard 100m actually is, but there again we wouldn't do it if it were easy!
Author: Mike Childs
Posted: Wed 28th Apr 2010, 18:50
Joined: 1990
Local Group: Dorset
Hi Rebecca and Elton. I have found that a 100 kilometre challenge event is more difficult psychologically than the Hundred . I am not sure why that is, but it may be that the slightly more forced pace gets to me a bit. Usually, on the Hundred, once I have had breakfast and resumed plodding, the second day and night is actually a bit easier than the first, possibly because the finish is in sight (so to speak) In any event. you both did fine on what I think may be a quite tough 100 kilometre event (and some reports suggest that the DG is about actually 103 km in total) So, well done, and we will see you in Scotland.
Author: Elton Ellis
Posted: Wed 28th Apr 2010, 15:32
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Surrey
Thanks Rebecca: Good luck to you too.

I find doing a 100 km before the Hundred is really useful because it jolts me back to reality. We know on an intellectual level that the Hundred is going to be hard, but we forget just how hard it is going to feel. The 3 a.m. emotional low on the 100 km drives the point home: we think: ‘How am I ever going to do another 55 miles of this on the Hundred?’

I suppose if we remembered exactly how every ache and pain felt, we’d never do another Hundred, but somehow delusional optimism overcomes experience.
Author: Rebecca Lawrence
Posted: Wed 28th Apr 2010, 12:55
Joined: 2003
Local Group: Marches
Well done Elton - it's finishing that matters. Scottish 100 isn't that bad really, just very slow going in parts, and if you suffer with blisters like I do, be careful about getting wet feet going across the burns. If you take the pressure off yourself and not worry about getting in before the second night for example it will be just fine. I've accepted that I'll take over 40 hours and will inevitably go through night 2 - but hey ho, I've done it before and survived so no real hardship. GOOD LUCK!!!!
Author: Elton Ellis
Posted: Mon 26th Apr 2010, 14:34
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Surrey
Thanks for your offer on recce details, Rebecca, but I think I'll pass. After the hammering I took on the Giant (25 hours!), any tales of gore and woe for Scotland might frighten me off altogether.
Posted: Sat 24th Apr 2010, 21:28
Joined: 1982
Have used them on our dogs since they were pups (10 year ago) but never on She who must be Obeyed or myself. Sent away to the USA via the net for the 1st one as they were hard to get over here.
Author: Louise Whittaker
Posted: Sat 24th Apr 2010, 11:51
Joined: 1994
Local Group: Staffordshire
Thanks for the tick tip. Just got a O'Tom Tick Twister from local vets - and for entertainment - go to the website tick-twister.com for video demonstration of removal technique.
Author: John King
Posted: Fri 23rd Apr 2010, 20:17
Joined: 2002
A tick Removal tool is also available from Veterinary surgery, no not Joking Nick for once I was serious rather than making a Flippant Tongue in cheek remark, guess i must be mellowing with age,;-)
Author: Nick Ham
Posted: Fri 23rd Apr 2010, 13:26
Joined: 1998
Local Group: South Manchester
Thanks for suggestions. I'll make a purchase. I've had a few ticks over the years but they've always been the almost microscopic size, never an adult. I've also had a recent test for Lyme Disease, which turned up negative, thankfully.
Author: Ken Falconer
Posted: Thu 22nd Apr 2010, 19:57
Joined: 1983
Local Group: Heart of Scotland
Yes, we have plenty of wildlife for you in Scotland - ticks, midges, adders, deer, white hare (they still haven't bothered to shed their winter coats), highland coos, wild haggis, ...

Seriously though, ticks now present a major health hazard to those who enjoy the outdoors, not only in Scotland but across the British Isles and in many parts of Europe. I am aware of two LDWA members who have contracted Lyme's disease from tick bites and there are probably others. As well as the links given in Garfield / Helen's post see the article in December 2009 Strider p23. For tick removal the O'Tom Tick Twister is recommended (just a couple of inches long and of negligible weight so it fits easily in a first aid kit) and is available via Amazon or through Lyme Disease Action.
Author: Garfield & Helen Southall
Posted: Thu 22nd Apr 2010, 14:53
Joined: 1991
Local Group: Merseystride
The suggestion to bring a tick remover with you is a good one. Ticks are an issue in Scotland; they mainly live on sheep and deer but aren't averse to human blood if it's available. The problem is that they can spread illnesses such as Lyme disease, which is can be very serious.

Prevention is better than cure, so long sleeves and covered legs are strongly recommended, but if you do pick up a tick it is important to remove it safely and as soon as possible, to minimise the chance of infection. There are a number of small, light, inexpensive gadgets available for this purpose. (I'm only going to be marshalling, but I've already got mine!)

For more information about Lyme disease, see:- http://www.lymediseaseaction.org.uk/lyme.htm

For suggestions re. tick removal tools, see:- http://www.lymediseaseaction.org.uk/shop/index.htm

There is a link to the Lyme disease site, and other useful information sources, from the 'Links' page on the HoS 100 event web-site ( http://www.heartofscotland100.org.uk/ ).
Author: Nick Ham
Posted: Thu 22nd Apr 2010, 12:31
Joined: 1998
Local Group: South Manchester
"Don`t Forget the TICK removal tool folks :-)"

You're JOKING, John. Eurgh.

Where would I get such a tool?
Posted: Tue 20th Apr 2010, 12:55
Joined: 2009
Less than six weeks to go & feeling very excited...Oh & a wee bit nervous it has to be said ;-) Having just completed the Woldsman this weekend, met plenty of folk who will be there on the day.

Just wanted to say thank you to the organisers for pulling the event together & giving people like me the opportunity to take part. Compared to the organising, running/walking the route is the easy bit i'm sure!!

I reccied the route back in Feb, the snow fall stopped me doing the section that has now changed so I shall look forward to the unknown!!! I'm hoping my navigation course will have equip me to find my way...all part of the fun ;-)

Thanks again, K
Author: Garfield & Helen Southall
Posted: Mon 19th Apr 2010, 21:45
Joined: 1991
Local Group: Merseystride
Hi all

Without getting into the debate about distance (although I admit I'm tempted!), I'd like to put in a quick plea for anyone who has a confirmed entry in the 100, but won't be able to take it up for some reason, to please let me know as soon as possible. (Please e-mail me at entries@heartofscotland100.org.uk .) Each cancellation received before 1st May will make space for someone currently on the waiting list.

Thanks, Helen.
Author: Rebecca Lawrence
Posted: Mon 19th Apr 2010, 18:59
Joined: 2003
Local Group: Marches
Good news about the heather and especially good news about the removal of the broken bridge and replacement with stones (hope they're big ones!) having survived shinning across the rotten poles once on the reccy, we weren't that keen on pushing our luck again after 500 people had been over them (presuming we will be one of the last ones over!). Really looking forward to the event and appreciate all your hard work in bringing this all together.
Author: Paul Hatcher
Posted: Mon 19th Apr 2010, 16:14
Joined: 1984
Local Group: Cumbria
Good news the Heather has been cut clearing the path across to Kirkmichael. The broken bridge/rotten poles has to be removed, (Health & Safety!) and will be replaced by large stones.(stepping stones?) as to the landslips we will look at these when we are up for the Marshals' Walk and again in the week before the event.
On distance, if only it was as simple as a few pen strokes, anyone that has had any input into writing a route discription knows that even a small change can take hours of rewriting and amending of checkpoint times etc, even with computers. Those of us that walked the White Rose Marshals' Walk covered in excess of 106 miles but were oblivious of this at the time as the route discription told us that it was only 100. But this was in the days before GPS and digital mapping, and I along with other are convinced that many other "100s" have been well over the100. If you still dont fancy it then there is still a waiting list for your place. We are not making any unforced changes now.
Author: Rebecca Lawrence
Posted: Thu 15th Apr 2010, 16:59
Joined: 2003
Local Group: Marches
Never tried having a beer during the event - I would probably not get going again, but after the event I can drink as much as I like with no effect - had 5 pints of Guinness once in 1.5 hours after the welsh 100 and it didn't have any effect - I was stone cold sober. How odd! Maybe my body's just grabbing the calories and fluid so it doesn't get in the system?

have fun on your reccy Merrian!
Author: Merrian Lancaster
Posted: Thu 15th Apr 2010, 16:04
Joined: 1996
Local Group: Beds, Bucks and Northants
Rebecca and Ken, thanks for your advice about beer. I feared I might have to load the van with beer from our local Concrete Cow brewery.

I’ve also found a list on the Tayside CAMRA website, and their secretary says…”If you are in Pitlochry, you must visit the Moulin Hotel, it has its own brewery just behind the hotel and is by far the best in the area. “ Goodie, we’re based in Pitlochry for a recce in the week before the marshals’.
Author: Matt Clarke
Posted: Wed 14th Apr 2010, 19:35
Joined: 1973
Local Group: Mid Wales
Is there going to be a metric version of the route description? Otherwise its going to take a while to convert all the yards to meters in order to use appropriately on a 1:25000 map for navigation purposes.
Author: Ken Falconer
Posted: Wed 14th Apr 2010, 18:44
Joined: 1983
Local Group: Heart of Scotland
As John says, you will need to go to the bars in the hotels to get your beer - and that's where the locals go. The Kirkmichael Hotel, the Atholl Arms in Blair Atholl (go to the bar round the back), and the Fortingall Hotel spring to mind, as well as quite a few hotels in Aberfeldy. You'll find Bellhaven Best in most of them.

The 'Heart of Scotland' is not really in distillery country - the main whisky areas are the Isle of Islay and Speyside (if you go up Ben Rinnes near Dufftown you can see at least a dozen distilleries from the top!). However there are various more isolated distilleries across Scotland. The 100 route goes past the gate of the Aberfeldy Distillery, and there is also the Blair Athol Distillery, which is actually located in Pitlochry so in the area but not on the route. The distilleries put on tours for visitors (for a price).
Author: John King
Posted: Wed 14th Apr 2010, 12:22
Joined: 2002
Not being Hard enough to be a Drinker :-) my knowledge of Pubs is limited but my observations when in Scotland is that Pub`s as they are Known south of the border are virtually non existent north of it, and they appear to be replaced by Bars in some very Fine hotels.

However if my geography is correct then i thought that the HOS 100 was bang in the middle of Distillery country, which would suggest that the pursuit of FINE MALTS rather than real ales would be the way to go.

For me though a NICE CUP OF TEA and lots of smiling faces at the checkpoints will do, not to strong though as i don`t want to OD on Caffeine. :-)
Author: Rebecca Lawrence
Posted: Wed 14th Apr 2010, 12:00
Joined: 2003
Local Group: Marches
We passed the Ewe which is attached the the Fortingall Hotel which is at 73(ish)m which sold real ale - easy to miss it - on the right of the building just before the checkpoint on the main road.
Author: Merrian Lancaster
Posted: Wed 14th Apr 2010, 11:30
Joined: 1996
Local Group: Beds, Bucks and Northants
All this talk about the reccies and no mention of pubs! I shall need a few pub stops while Dave is doing the marshals’ event. Are there any on the route? If not, then I’d appreciate any information about pubs, in the area, serving real ale please. Cheers!
Author: John King
Posted: Wed 14th Apr 2010, 11:25
Joined: 2002
Don`t Forget the TICK removal tool folks :-)
Author: Rebecca Lawrence
Posted: Wed 14th Apr 2010, 9:27
Joined: 2003
Local Group: Marches
No problem Elton - if you like any more details about how we found it and any tricky bits then let me have your email address. Looking forward to it big time!!!
Author: John King
Posted: Tue 13th Apr 2010, 21:21
Joined: 2002
Nowt hard about me in fact I am a big Wuss, as to breaking the ice for a dip in the burn @ 6-30 I would prefer to think that if i had spent the night in a Bivy Bag then my Journey would have continued well before 6-30. ;-)
Author: Elton Ellis
Posted: Tue 13th Apr 2010, 18:14
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Surrey
Thanks Rebecca and John PC for your recce comments. They are really useful. I'd rather know in advance if the route is going to be tough, rather than think it is going to be a doddle and get a nasty shock with 90 miles to go.

John EK: yeah, well you're one of the hard men, we all know that. Most of us don't bivvy (or camp) at -25 deg, then break the ice for a refreshing plunge into the burn at 6:30 in the morning.
Author: Rebecca Lawrence
Posted: Tue 13th Apr 2010, 14:47
Joined: 2003
Local Group: Marches
I'm the sort of person who always reads the last chapter of the book first so I don't get any nasty surprises. No real issues with it being 105 - I would rather know now than find out the distances are out on the RD when I'm doing the event. Going to be definate second night job for me though. My one big question is will the certificate when (if!!) I finish say 105m or will it say 100? Would be nice to have the added achievement on the certificate!!
Author: Garfield & Helen Southall
Posted: Mon 12th Apr 2010, 22:14
Joined: 1991
Local Group: Merseystride
Me too, John.

Bring it on !

(Garfield)
Author: John King
Posted: Mon 12th Apr 2010, 20:38
Joined: 2002
That is what I love about Scotland, it is a wonderful remote,often demanding Landscape, that has a tendency to throw up surprises and puzzles to solve.

I have to say though , that the comment`s based on peoples recce`s, although obviously well intentioned, for me at least I have found them to be akin to somebody looking over my shoulder while watching a good film, or reading a good book and telling you what happens next, therefore screwing up the excitement and suspense.

105 miles instead of a 100, I can`t see a problem with that as I never start an event thinking about it`s final distance, as i tend to break event`s down into distances that i can comfortably and do frequently cover.
i.e. 100 miles is just 5, 20 mile trips, and 5 mile is just my early morning daily outing with with my dog, so that`s no big deal, i find that the best Psychological approach for me at least.

I have to say I for one am really looking forward to the Event.
Author: Edith Moran
Posted: Mon 12th Apr 2010, 10:29
Joined: 1986
Local Group: Cleveland
David Powell is living in cloud cuckoo land if he thinks we can just clip off bits here and there. There are reasons why the route is as it is. This is Scotland and I make no apologies for there not being paved paths over the moors. I appreciate people who were up at Easter will have had a tough time because of the weather but I hope it will have reminded entrants that they should carry all the kit mentioned on the entry form. The weather is improving now and although there will still be snow on the tops, hopefully most will have melted and the streams will have subsided.
Author: Rebecca Lawrence
Posted: Mon 12th Apr 2010, 9:00
Joined: 2003
Local Group: Marches
Having now walked the entire route, I think its going to be a tough 100 for several reasons - lots of bushwhacking - the revised section after glenmore bothy took nearly 1 hour to do 1000yrds, the burns - we did the section between Kirkmichael and Blair Atholl on Tuesday when we had all that rain - the burns were torrents, and even the ford was approx 18 inches deep, which meant soaking feet for the rest of that days walk. The 'broken bridge' at Allt Loch Valigan GR NN957686 was a few poles over a raging torrent - I shinned across on my hands and knees - will this be replaced for the event - if there is a lot of rain I could imagine some people wouldn't be comfortable crossing it if the burn is as high as it was when we did, and the other factor is some of the stretches are a little monotonous - the 5.88m along the old A9, and some of the last sections through the managed forest which doesn't really change for nearly 8m, will be mentally tough. Enjoyed the reccy though, also came across the land slips mentioned in previous post, so presume there will be some last minute alterations?
Author: C Mark Edwards
Posted: Sun 11th Apr 2010, 17:56
Joined: 1980
Local Group: Merseystride
Why not mark up your route desciption with the distances to the end of the walk, rather than the distances completed? That way the extra miles will all be at the beginning of the walk when you are fresh and full of energy! Although this might seem to make no difference, it could work psychologically if you are just counting down the miles.
Posted: Sun 11th Apr 2010, 7:54
Joined: 1982
Sorry last bit should have said NOT clip bits off
Posted: Sun 11th Apr 2010, 7:18
Joined: 1982
You have still got to do them wherever they come in, so it makes no difference if they are at the start the middle or the end, they will be hard but thats the challenge to complete the route as set by the organisers and clip bits off.
Author: John Phillips
Posted: Sat 10th Apr 2010, 6:12
Joined: 2007
Local Group: South Pennine
Re extra mileage, thankfully the extra miles fall at a place where most walkers will arrive in daylight on Sunday so shouldn't be too big an issue.
Author: John Patrick Cunnane
Posted: Fri 9th Apr 2010, 2:43
Joined: 1998
Local Group: South Wales
I reccied 90 miles with a friend over the Easter weekend.
We saw that there have been two recent landslips both directly affecting the line of the 100 route which have been fenced off & will need to be taken into account, minor diversions only needed hopefully, one when leaving Blair Atholl along the river, and the second approaching Dunkeld across the bridge after Ossian's Hall.
The weather last Tuesday was awful. There were many burns cascading down the hill and much snow still in high spots obscuring the clefts near Tempar Bothy.
Visibility was poor and it was difficult for me to follow the next part of the route description. I wear glasses and my vision was impaired by the rain & unfortunately could get no sight of the crucial fence line by the burn, despite much effort; the burn itself was a raging torrent so uncrossable in any event. The weather can however only get better!
We noted that various works are due to be carried out, eg a broken stile, and path clearances approaching Kirkmichael. Without these works there would undoubtedly be difficulties on the event.
Although there are many long track sections there is a good amount of bushwhacking to do, much more than I remember from other Hundreds, & which makes for tough going.
There is speculation that this will be an easy event, yet I suspect it will be one of the more difficult Hundreds of recent years and it will be interesting to see whether finishing times will overall be slower.
Very much looking forward to a great event, well done to the organising Committee for all your hard work.
Author: David Powell
Posted: Tue 6th Apr 2010, 10:22
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Heart of England
Hi Garfield
My experience with digital mapping is it generally under estimates the true distance because it substitutes straight lines for curves.
I'm looking forward to the stupendous scenery and quite agree with you that viewed from this perspective 4 1/2 miles is not a lot to worry about, it could even be argued that the extra miles are a free bonus. However after 99.5 miles with several good blisters, "undercarriage" shot to pieces and muscles cramped my appreciation of the views may be waning and the thoughts of the extra 5 miles- that could easily have been avoided by a few quick pen strokes by the organisers- may not be so charitable.

Regards
Dave
Author: C Mark Edwards
Posted: Mon 5th Apr 2010, 20:24
Joined: 1980
Local Group: Merseystride
At least we have been warned about the extra miles. I've just been looking back at the Cleveland 100 from 1993, which I think was about 106 miles in reality although the route description only admitted to 102.4. On that route, if you add up the straight line distances between the grid references mentioned in the first section, you get to 12.2 miles (so the actual length was somewhat more than this) - the official length of the section was only 11.3 miles! I would far rather have accurate distances than have the organisers pretend that the route was not too long.
Author: Geoff Saunders
Posted: Mon 5th Apr 2010, 19:39
Joined: 1972
Local Group: Merseystride
Oops. In the first paragraph of my previous posting, I meant (obviously) 17.6 yards not miles.
Author: Geoff Saunders
Posted: Mon 5th Apr 2010, 16:30
Joined: 1972
Local Group: Merseystride
Oh come on, Garfield, who’re you trying to kid? 100 miles measured precisely to two decimal places! That’s a total accuracy of 17.6 miles or just over 6 inches in every mile. Do you really believe that?

Using mapping software, there will be intrinsic errors from:
• the individual. The route is approximated to a series of straight lines. How carefully do you position your nodes and how many do you use?
• the map. Maps can’t be totally accurate. As an example, just measure the width of a road on a 1:25000 map or a 1:50000 map and scale it up.
• the definition of the route. For instance, do you take it round the middle of bends, the outside or the inside? If two people walk side-by-side round a right-angled curve on a 2 ft wide footpath, the outer one will walk over 3 feet further than the inner one on that one bend (2πr and all that).
• the software. Eg topographical miles are more realistic than map miles but how does the software calculate them?
• probably other factors that you can think of yourself.
These errors, individually, are only very small and will tend to balance one another out but, over 100 miles, the total is likely to be considerably greater than your .01 mile. (I have evidence of measurements for the same 20-mile route using two different mapping systems differing by over a mile, but there may have been other factors involved there – I am merely quoting it to show that you must be careful and not necessarily believe manufacturers’ claims).

Alternatively, using a GPS, we all know that, on the same walk measured by x different units, you will get x different answers, often differing by 2-3%.

Regarding your second paragraph, I think David Powell was right. The 100 is as much a mental challenge as a physical one. Imagine someone completely knackered with aching limbs and six miles still to go. In the “little wheel device” days he would think he had only done 94 miles and accept the extra six as part of the challenge. On this year’s 100 he will think he has already done 98 and will begrudge those extra four (ie at that point in time, an additional 200%). It’s all in the mind.
Author: Tony Willey
Posted: Mon 5th Apr 2010, 11:15
Joined: 1989
Local Group: Lakeland
My own strategy on pre-walking the Hundred is if possible to recce the 20 miles or so that I expect to walk in the dark to add to my confidence in finding the way and to view the countryside that will be invisible on the event. Other than that I find it far preferable to walk it for the first time on the event. For me mental tiredness is at least as much a challenge on a Hundred as the physical test, and the anticipation of what delights are around the corner helps to keep the interest level up. Having to concentrate on navigation also helps to keep you alert and avoid the "automatic pilot" syndrome when mistakes are easily made.These comments apply up to somewhere around 10am on Sunday morning when the real tiredness sets in. Hopefully by then I have joined up with others to share the navigation and avoid the inevitable errors that your befuddled mind makes at this stage.

This year I am walking the Marshals Hundred. I have run out of time for a recce but I am informed by those in the know that the navigation for the night section is easy peasy. Perhaps we will be following footprints in the snow!
Author: Rebecca Lawrence
Posted: Sun 4th Apr 2010, 21:19
Joined: 2003
Local Group: Marches
Thanks Ken for the reply to my posting. Sounds better than expected. I am in the Atholl Arms writing this in Dunkeld with a mixture of dred and anticipation for what lies in store weather wise. Walking the entire route over 5 days and back packing between B&B's. Interesting comments about whether to reccy or not. I've done 3 100's blind - i.e. no reccy, and 3 with reccy's. I actually prefer reccying the route as firstly I treat it as a holiday and treat myself to nice accommodation en route, and I'm sure the local hotels and B&B's benefit from the income generated, and secondly I can walk at a slower pace than the actual event and enjoy the route rather than spending 50% of the time in pain which normally happens on the actual event, and to be honest I get way beyond caring about the scenery. Not being brilliant at map reading and not wanting to resort to the safety blanket of a GPS, reccying the route gives me a degree of confidence that I will know sooner rather than later if I have made a navigational error.
Author: Garfield & Helen Southall
Posted: Sun 4th Apr 2010, 20:03
Joined: 1991
Local Group: Merseystride
In these days of mapping software and GPS logs, it's very easy to be precise about distances and ascent/descent. The Heart of Scotland 100 is currently 104.44 miles. A few of the more recent hundreds have been 1 or 2 miles over the 100 that I have measured with my various gadgets. I also suggest that the routes planned in the era when all we had was a little wheel device to measure distances, were way over the mark too.
Another factor to offset against the 4 miles is the straightforward nature of the route. Very few stiles, good quick tracks and not many tricky fields to cross. Add also the spectacular scenery and, I think you'll agree, 4 miles is very little to worry about.
(Garfield)
Author: David Powell
Posted: Sun 4th Apr 2010, 19:16
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Heart of England
Hi
just a quick note to the organisers- viewed from the perspective of 2 months before the event the extra 5 miles may seem a small addition. However on the day after having completed 100 miles those extra 5 miles will take on a gigantic perspective and I would strongly advise walk organisers to steer clear of this area for fear of lynching parties. The alternative is to look at the route and shave off little bits here and there. For instance coming out of Blair Athol a slight adjustment to the route could knock a kilometer off- Is there the possibility of taking the alternative route around Loch Kennard that would save 2kms. The approach to Errochty Dam looks like 3/4 of a km could be saved or the route out of Aberfeldy via the military road and Duntaggart might save .5 of a km.

I appreciate that a tremendous amount of work has been put in on the route and what looks possible on the map may be impracticable on the ground but please do all you can to get that figure a bit nearer to 100.

Regards

David Powell
Posted: Sun 4th Apr 2010, 19:08
Joined: 1982
Thanks for the information Ken, It will help with the planning. Following the C2C cycle track (cross country version) up to Hartside cafe and over Fiends Fell today showed that the snow is still with us down here.
Author: Ken Falconer
Posted: Sun 4th Apr 2010, 18:49
Joined: 1983
Local Group: Heart of Scotland
In reply to David: After leaving the road after Kinloch Rannoch there is a very good and steadily graded track up to the Tempar bothy. From there the next 2/3 mile contours along intermittent sheep tracks which are fairly easy to spot (at least when there is no snow about). The descent to the main burn and along to the shielings and the meeting of two burns is rather rougher over tussocky heather. (It doesn't really matter if you don't identify the 'third small cleft' exactly and drop down to the burn too soon or too late). Hopefully crossing the burns will not be difficult - yesterday there was a good deal of snow-melt water coming down but (in boots) I didn't get my feet wet (I would have done in trainers). The ground along by the fence by the Allt Mor is fairly good, though it may be boggy in places after wet weather. Striking up from the Allt Mor to the track is a gradual ascent over tussocky heather moor, but not unduly rough. Once the track is reached you are on very good tracks and paths right through to the finish.

Virtually everyone will be doing this section in daylight and there are enough landmarks so that there should be no serious problems with navigation. Between the two tracks those in boots are likely to find the going easier than those in trainers. I believe that there may be marshals at the burn crossing to provide assistance if necessary. Lots of lovely scenery - just enjoy it!

There is no intention of diverting the route along the road to Keltneyburn. However, as with other Hundreds, there are contingency plans for extreme conditions, see the Risk Assessment (which is on the Heart of Scotland website).

Hope this answers your points.

Cheers
Ken
Posted: Sun 4th Apr 2010, 18:39
Joined: 1982
Peter I beat you to that one twenty years ago but you could have "The Grouch"
Author: Jeremy John Corke
Posted: Sun 4th Apr 2010, 18:13
Joined: 2003
Local Group: Bristol & West
Travelling to Event.
I am going by air from Bristol to Edingburgh on Saturday morning, arriving at 10 am approx. I expect to start event either 12 am or 2 pm.
Is anyone else flying up, as I have not yet worked out how to get to event (via Perth)?
It will either be public transport or car hire?
Author: Peter Haslam
Posted: Sun 4th Apr 2010, 17:20
Joined: 1992
Local Group: East Lancashire
If we have nicknames on here David, I will fight you for "Mr Grumpy"
Posted: Sun 4th Apr 2010, 7:57
Joined: 1982
Ken, I am just about to leave for Hartside in Cumbria as I cannot get up past the Border this weekend but I suspect that like many who have entered for the 100 I am wondering what the bit between Kinloch Rannoch & Pheiginn Bothy is like & esp the crossing of the Allt Mor and if as was hinted in Strider that there is a chance that the route may be diverted yet again to go via the road to Keltney
Yours
David H
PS I Still think we should be able to use nicknames on this these pages.
Author: Ken Falconer
Posted: Sat 3rd Apr 2010, 22:22
Joined: 1983
Local Group: Heart of Scotland
In reply to Rebecca: There are currently patches of soft drifted snow on the higher parts of the 100 route, particular on the sections on either side of Kinloch Rannoch. The snow is melting fairly fast so it is very wet underfoot and the burns are full but crossable. The route is certainly walkable but the going is slow on the higher cross country parts and you will certainly get wet feet. Hopefully some warmer weather in the next few weeks will dry out the hillsides.
Author: John King
Posted: Fri 2nd Apr 2010, 18:32
Joined: 2002
No Recce for me either, personally I like the challenge of covering the ground on sight so to speak.
Then its Map, Compass and route guide on day.

The GPS will be in my Sac for the duration of the event, recording all my navigational errors, for me to learn from, once it has been downloaded onto digital mapping after the event, i like to do this, to give me a historical record, that maybe someday will give me pleasure and remind me of how good life is, and has been.
Posted: Thu 1st Apr 2010, 18:46
Joined: 1982
Second that John.
Author: John Phillips
Posted: Thu 1st Apr 2010, 18:15
Joined: 2007
Local Group: South Pennine
Think I am one of the few not doing a recce before the event. Nor do I have a fancy GPS. To make life easy for me would it be possible for those who KNOW where they are going perhaps wear yellow so I don't end up following someone who doesn't.
Author: Rebecca Lawrence
Posted: Thu 1st Apr 2010, 16:43
Joined: 2003
Local Group: Marches
Planning to reccy the route Mon - Fri of next week. Has anyone walked the route in the past couple of days since the fresh fall of snow - how bad is it???!!!! Weather over the weekend seems to be more rain than snow with heavy rain on Mon, but obviously concerned re how accessible the route will be?
Author: Garfield & Helen Southall
Posted: Tue 30th Mar 2010, 8:02
Joined: 1991
Local Group: Merseystride
Ken Falconer has reported a foot of fresh snow in the Braemar region. If you are planning to recce the walk over Easter, please check conditions.

The Met Office site for the Eastern Highlands shows HIGH RISK in many categories ...
http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/loutdoor/mountainsafety/easthighland/easthighland_latest_pressure.html

(Garfield)
Posted: Sun 28th Mar 2010, 22:03
Joined: 1982
Eileen, a strange but true tale about Scotland. A few years ago we were staying on a Caravan park near Cullodon. We walked the dogs every day in the woods behind the caravans and every thing was all right till we got to a certain spot, from where you could see the battlefield and our normaly daft but down to earth dogs would go no further, we scouted round that bit of the woods and the dogs were OK but there was noway we could get them over that one opening. So maybe the wild haggis were around
Author: Eileen Greenwood
Posted: Sun 28th Mar 2010, 21:20
Joined: 2002
Local Group: Yorkshire Coast
I'm still spurned on by the thought of Wild Haggis in the Glens. After 100 miles and still walking more miles to the finish I will be hallucinating Wild Haggis and all sorts!

Still a new achievement for us all 100 miles+ and you can do 100 miles plus 5 you can do 100 miles plus...xx!
Author: Peter H Grayson
Posted: Sun 28th Mar 2010, 19:12
Joined: 1978
On Monday I did a recce of the new route. Most of the snow had gone but it was very wet, so if you have dry socks at the breakfast stop don’t put them on till you reach Pheiginn Bothy.

Whilst there I stayed at Coshieville House, only 400 metres from the route at Keltneyburn. It’s a nice place to stay and still has vacancies around the time of the 100. For details see www.aberfeldybandb.com.
Posted: Tue 16th Mar 2010, 11:20
Joined: 1982
“Down to Rules & Regs” eh. The ones that were made for the guidance of the wise, the blind obedience of the foolish and the abuse of the unscrupulous. I hope the organisers of the 100 will be the wise ones and guide the rest of us poor souls.
Author: Eileen Greenwood
Posted: Mon 15th Mar 2010, 20:15
Joined: 2002
Local Group: Yorkshire Coast
Very interesting! I personally would not consider myself as finishing until the very end at the last checkpoint/finish. But there could well be a few falling/failing folks down at the 101+ miles! 'Tis down to rules and regs again!!
Author: Rob Richardson
Posted: Mon 15th Mar 2010, 19:48
Joined: 1986
Local Group: South Wales
The interesting situation now arises, whereby those reaching CP17 will already have completed 101+ miles. It would most unfortunate to have to retire at this CP, so close to the finish, having completed the distance. Maybe the timed finish should be at CP17, followed by a gentle stroll/hobble/limp down to Dunkeld?
Author: Garfield & Helen Southall
Posted: Mon 8th Mar 2010, 15:47
Joined: 1991
Local Group: Merseystride
Thanks, Albert.
Although one of the organisers, I've not had chance to even think about actually doing the walk yet! Glad to hear there are stretches where I can switch to autopilot. A number of people who've done the course have commented on the pace of the route. Hopefully the snow will have melted by May! (Garfield)
Author: Albert Bowes
Posted: Mon 8th Mar 2010, 15:08
Joined: 1990
Local Group: Cleveland
I have made several trips to Scotland with members of the Cleveland Group to check out the route on behalf of the 100 Committee.

Scotland is not like England or indeed Wales were there is usually lots of alternative paths to chose from, this route is well devised and planned. The Landowners reluctance to allow the event to use the track from Glenmore Bothy to Fortingall due to cattle is unfortunate and will probably mean a wee bit of rough walking up to Pheiginn Bothy, however a lot of the route is on long wide tracks which are easy to navigate and I can see walkers on auto pilot bombing along making good progress.

From the early days of checking out this route I thought this would be one of the very fast 100’s – the extra distance will have some effect but not too much. I have done tougher 100’s than this one, but nowhere near as dramatic or scenic. Good luck to all entrants.
Author: Edith Moran
Posted: Mon 8th Mar 2010, 13:40
Joined: 1986
Local Group: Cleveland
The reason for the change of route is because of some 150 cows, calves and bulls which will be roaming the hillside on the stretch before Fortingall and the landowner is concerned the amount of people passing through may cause a stampede. Whether or not this is the case, we would be failing in our duty of care not to do something about this. Ken Falconer has kindly gone to look at this for us and done a route description but it is a difficult area to describe especially at the moment as it is full of snow. On the main event we will have personnel in this area to guide walkers over the stream and put you on the right track.

The new distance according to my tracklogs is 104.44 miles, and the ascent, which has reduced, is 13,261 ft. Of course every system will give a different reading and 10 people walking the same route with 10 GPS will come to different numbers, but mine is the one we are working on.

The calculation for closing times is usually based on average 2.1 mph and this has been adjusted to 2.2 mph. I have done 100s with over 150 stiles and I believe there are less than 10 on this route so the timing should not be a problem taking this into consideration.

We have heard about a landslip on the route near the end just after Ossian's Cave. The Footpath Officer is aware of this and in view of the popularity of this area it is hoped it will be remedied quickly. However for those who may be doing a recce, until that happens you may need to divert through Inver Village and rejoin the route.

I am very sorry about the change to the route but if we are all as positive as Eileen, we will overcome. Oh, the joys or organising a hundred.
Author: Eileen Greenwood
Posted: Mon 8th Mar 2010, 0:52
Joined: 2002
Local Group: Yorkshire Coast
Whatever- who cares, go out to enjoy the company, atmosphere and views! And the checkpoints! Yummie! I'll gain half a stone and some..

Wild Haggis in the Glens? I hope so! Give me something and us females to spur on us on! And men? Well you too busy getting to the end. Us women have plenty of energy to look out for a bit of distraction- multi tasking and all that!!

I am looking forward to it. 110/120 miles- "bring it on
Posted: Sun 7th Mar 2010, 20:23
Joined: 1982
Rumours are horrible, it's probably a 110 and if you are English you are allowed two hours less and there have been sightings of wild Haggis in the glens
Author: George Foxton
Posted: Sun 7th Mar 2010, 19:25
Joined: 1984
Local Group: East Lancashire
Just heard a horrible rumour that the 2010 "100" is now actually 105 miles! Hope we'll have an extra hour or 2 to get round.

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